Blogroll, Community, Library Programs, Library services, Recommended Reading

Books By Canadian Authors

Books by Canadian Authors

Did you know?

A plethora of Canadian authors live among us. Greats such as L.M Montgomery, Margaret Atwood, Alice Munro, Robert Munsch, Stephen Leacock, Yann Martel and Chris Hadfield to name a few. So, collecting the following Canadian young adult novelists from so many was no easy feat. You can enjoy them right from our shelves or give Hoopla/Overdrive a try. And in retrospect, I’ve included an interesting detail about our fellow Canadians. If there’s an author you would have included on this list please let me know about them in the comments below. Oh and see you at the next teen book club, ‘Science Fiction and Fantasy’ on May 16, 2019 from 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm.

Child of Dandelions by Shenazz Nanjii

ALBERTA

Child of Dandelions by Shenaaz Nanjii, July 25, 2008

Nanji was born on the ancient island of Mombasa, Kenya, one of the oldest settlements on the East African coast.

A Thousand Shades of Blue by Robin Stevenson

BRITISH COLOMBIA

A Thousand Shades of Blue by Robin Stevenson, October 1, 2008

Stevenson often visits schools to talk about books, writing and LGBTQ+ issues.

Bad Boy by Diana Wieler

MANITOBA

Bad Boy by Diana Wieler, March 1, 1990

“The Whole World is full of stories in motion.” – Diana Wieler

Black Water Rising by Robert Rayner

NEW BRUNSWICK

Black Water Rising by Robert Rayner,

Rayner likes to listen to music and plays keyboard and saxophone in a band.

Catching the Light by Susan Sinnott

NEWFOUNDLAND

Catching the Light by Susan Sinnott, April 28, 2018

Sinnott was born in the UK and now lives in St John’s, Newfoundland.

The Lesser Blessed by Richard van Camp

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

The Lesser Blessed by Richard Van Camp, February 27, 2016

Van Camp’s novel, The Lesser Blessed was adapted into critically acclaimed film by director Anita Doron in 2012.

Rat by Lesley Choyce

NOVA SCOTIA

Rat by Lesley Choyce, October 12. 2012

Choyce is a year-round surfer and founding member of the 1990s spoken word rock band, The SurfPoets.

Born with Erika and Gianni by Lorna Schultz

ONTARIO

Born With Erika and Gianni by Lorna Schultz Nicholson, January 27, 2016

Nicholson worked as a Fitness and Recreation Co-ordinator at the University of Victoria where she also coached rowing.

Kira's Quest by Orysia Dawydiak

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Kira’s Quest by Orysia Dawydiak, September 1, 2015

Dawydiak enjoys writing for young people about life on a an sland sheep farm to coastal fishing communities where the possibilities of alternate life forms become real.

Shattered Glass by Teresa Toten

QUEBEC

Shattered Glass by Teresa Toten, September 29, 2015

“When the sky is purple and the writing is going really well being a writer is almost as good as being a mermaid.” – Teresa Toten

SASKATCHEWAN

Yellow Dog: A Coming Of Age Novel by Miriam Körner, October 26, 2016

Körner ran her first thousand-mile dog team and canoe expedition along the ancient routes of the North.

YUKON

The Golden Trail: The Story of the Klondike Rush by Pierre Berton, December 4, 2004

In 1971, on the Pierre Berton Show, Berton interviewed famous martial artist Bruce Lee in what is his only surviving television interview.

Other notable Canadian Authors

Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women by Mary Beth Leatherdale and Lisa Charleyboy, September 12, 2017

“I will not beat myself up for something someone else did to me – that poison is theirs.” – Lisa Charleyboy

Skating Over Thin Ice by Jean Mills, June 18, 2018

Mills received encouragement from the editors to continue writing even after her first book project about a young girl struggling to find acceptance as a goalie on her brother’s hockey team was never published.

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Blogroll, Community, Library Programs, Library services, Recommended Reading

Books That You Can’t Stop Thinking About









Books That You Can’t Stop
Thinking About

I can’t stop thinking about it – even after all these years. It’s a state of mind or so I’m told. By definition, a person’s state: mood. Give me a large oak tree trunk to prop against or a soft chair with pillows (arms a must!) and natural light and I could be reading comfortably in any state of mind. Oh, and not the song by the way. Albeit, Mr. Piano man himself could key up a few notes here to get us thinking about this next collection of, “Books That We Can’t Stop Thinking About”. Now humming, ‘… it comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide, it’s a New York state of mind.’ Well, it’s a Belleville Library state of mind! The teenagers last month all filed in with books in hand along with the first promising signs of Spring. It’s the right set up for some new and some old reads. Certainly, a trip down memory lane for some of us and hopefully your next favourite read as well. Let me know what you think of the following nine book suggestions. Did you try any of the books from last month’s topic, “Books That Make Your Heart Pound”? Oh, and drop me a line or two. 😉

P.S. See you at the next one,
April 18th, April Teen Book Club – Books By Canadian Authors
May 16th, May Teen Book Club – Books on Science Fiction and Fantasy

And for your viewing and listening pleasure Mr. Piano Man himself. 😉

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, October 8, 1988

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic. Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

The Poet X by Elizabeth Agevedo, March 6, 2018

A young girl in Harlem discovers slam poetry as a way to understand her mother’s religion and her own relationship to the world. Debut novel of renowned slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo.
Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking.
But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself. So when she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, much less speak her words out loud. But still, she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems. Because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent.

The Love and Lies of Ruksana Ali by Sabina Khan, January 29, 2019

Seventeen-year-old Rukhsana Ali tries her hardest to live up to her conservative Muslim parents’ expectations, but lately she’s finding that harder and harder to do. She rolls her eyes instead of screaming when they blatantly favor her brother and she dresses conservatively at home, saving her crop tops and makeup for parties her parents don’t know about. Luckily, only a few more months stand between her carefully monitored life in Seattle and her new life at Caltech, where she can pursue her dream of becoming an engineer. But when her parents catch her kissing her girlfriend Ariana, all of Rukhsana’s plans fall apart. Her parents are devastated; being gay may as well be a death sentence in the Bengali community. They immediately whisk Rukhsana off to Bangladesh, where she is thrown headfirst into a world of arranged marriages and tradition. Only through reading her grandmother’s old diary is Rukhsana able to gain some much needed perspective. Rukhsana realizes she must find the courage to fight for her love, but can she do so without losing everyone and everything in her life? 

Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume, February 12, 2005

Davey has never felt so alone in her life. Her father is dead (shot in a holdup) and now her mother is moving the family to New Mexico to try to recover. Climbing in Los Alamos Canyons, Davey meets mysterous Wolf, who seems to understand the rage and fear she feels. Slowly, with Wolf’s help, Davey realizes that she must get on with her life. But when will she be ready to leave the past behind? Will she ever stop hurting?

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling, September 1, 2014

Harry Potter is leaving Privet Drive for the last time. But as he climbs into the sidecar of Hagrid’s motorbike and they take to the skies, he knows Lord Voldemort and the Death Eaters will not be far behind. The protective charm that has kept him safe until now is broken. But the Dark Lord is breathing fear into everything he loves. And he knows he can’t keep hiding. To stop Voldemort, Harry knows he must find the remaining Horcruxes and destroy them. He will have to face his enemy in one final battle.
–jkrowling.com

Go Ask Alice by Beatrix Sparks (as Anonymous), January 1, 2006

It started when she was served a soft drink laced with LSD in a dangerous party game. Within months, she was hooked, trapped in a downward spiral that took her from her comfortable home and loving family to the mean streets of an unforgiving city. It was a journey that would rob her of her innocence, her youth — and ultimately her life. Read her diary. Enter her world. You will never forget her.

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson, April 1, 2011

The first ten lies they tell you in high school. “Speak up for yourself—we want to know what you have to say.” From the first moment of her freshman year at Merryweather High, Melinda knows this is a big fat lie, part of the nonsense of high school. She is friendless, outcast, because she busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops, so now nobody will talk to her, let alone listen to her. As time passes, she becomes increasingly isolated and practically stops talking altogether. Only her art class offers any solace, and it is through her work on an art project that she is finally able to face what really happened at that terrible party: she was raped by an upperclassman, a guy who still attends Merryweather and is still a threat to her. Her healing process has just begun when she has another violent encounter with him. But this time Melinda fights back, refuses to be silent, and thereby achieves a measure of vindication.
In Laurie Halse Anderson’s powerful novel, an utterly believable heroine with a bitterly ironic voice delivers a blow to the hypocritical world of high school. She speaks for many a disenfranchised teenager while demonstrating the importance of speaking up for oneself.
Speak was a 1999 National Book Award Finalist for Young People’s Literature.

Restart by Gordon Korman, May 30, 2017

Chase’s memory just went out the window. Chase doesn’t remember falling off the roof. He doesn’t remember hitting his head. He doesn’t, in fact, remember anything. He wakes up in a hospital room and suddenly has to learn his whole life all over again . . . starting with his own name. He knows he’s Chase. But who is Chase? When he gets back to school, he sees that different kids have very different reactions to his return. Some kids treat him like a hero. Some kids are clearly afraid of him. One girl in particular is so angry with him that she pours her frozen yogurt on his head the first chance she gets. Pretty soon, it’s not only a question of who Chase is–it’s a question of who he was . . . and who he’s going to be.From the #1 bestselling author of Swindle and Slacker, Restart is the spectacular story of a kid with a messy past who has to figure out what it means to get a clean start.

The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate, January 6, 2015

Ivan is an easygoing gorilla. Living at the Exit 8 Big Top Mall and Video Arcade, he has grown accustomed to humans watching him through the glass walls of his domain. He rarely misses his life in the jungle. In fact, he hardly ever thinks about it at all. Instead, Ivan thinks about TV shows he’s seen and about his friends Stella, an elderly elephant, and Bob, a stray dog. But mostly Ivan thinks about art and how to capture the taste of a mango or the sound of leaves with color and a well-placed line. Then he meets Ruby, a baby elephant taken from her family, and she makes Ivan see their home—and his own art—through new eyes. When Ruby arrives, change comes with her, and it’s up to Ivan to make it a change for the better. Katherine Applegate blends humor and poignancy to create Ivan’s unforgettable first-person narration in a story of friendship, art, and hope.

All book excerpts taken from www.goodreads.com

Recommended Reading

2018 Novelties

Everyone likes to speculate about trends: fashion, sports, video games… But this is a library’s blog, so let’s concentrate on books. Here are a few Young Adult books announced for 2018 that: 1) Are/were impatiently awaited by all the bookish community 2) Belleville Public Library owns copies.

You may choose between: western with a kick-ass female protagonist (Gunslinger girl), historical thriller (Orphan Monster Spy), short romance stories (Meet Cute) or apocalyptic with a side of zombies novel (Dread nation). Maybe you would prefer murder mystery? (Truly devious, People like us, Murdertrending) This is like a literary buffet!

Click on the covers to get more info!

 

Tell us what is your favorite read of 2018!

Recommended Reading

If you liked Turtle all the way down…

Are books with a main protagonist having a mental illness a trend? OCDaniel by Wesley King, Bent not broken by Lorna Schultz Nicholson, A tragic kind of wonderful by Eric Lindstrom… Turtles all the way down is a good example of this trend. The main character, Aza is anxious and has obsessive-compulsive behaviors that threaten her social life… well actually it threatens her actual life too. (DAM dam DAM… suspense!)

 

So, my opinion is: it’s a good book, but Paper towns and The fault in our stars are better. So whether you liked Turtles all the way down or not, read the two others they are worth it. Especially Paper towns, in my opinion.

 

 

This said, you may have liked Turtles all the way down so much you want a read-alike. Here are some for you if it is the case!

Enjoy the spring warmth by reading one of them outside!

Recommended Reading

If you liked Maze Runner…

Maze Runner is a really popular series of YA dystopian fiction. Fast-paced, dark and mysterious, the first book begins as Thomas wakes up in the middle of a gigantic maze with no memories whatsoever. There is three books in the series: The maze runner, The scorch trials and The death cure. The kill order was published afterward but is actually a prequel. You may click on the covers here to get more information.

   

If you liked this excellent thrilling series, some of the titles below might appeal to you as well!

aconfusionofprincesgarthnix  darkestmindsalexndrabracken deliriumlaurenoliver enclaveannaguirre incarceroncatherinefisher jamesdashner lefthandofgodpaulhoffman legendmarielu matchedallysonbraithwaite partialsdanwells supernaturalisteioncolferthe5thwaverichardyancey ugliesscottwesterfeld unwindnealshusterman variantrobisonwells

Let us know which is your favorite fast-paced action book of all time!

Community, Recommended Reading

Tough Topics

Sometimes, life sucks. Sometimes, we have unexpected ordeals thrown at us and  it’s overwhelming. It’s not always easy to talk about it. It may be embarrassing or so overpowering the words won’t come out. Even though other people may have been in the same situation. And sometimes, people wrote about tough times. It can be of help, when you don’t know where to turn.

Librarians can help you find the information you are looking for… however, you may prefer to keep it private, in which case this list of Dewey Call Numbers where you may find books about the subject(s) that interest you may prove useful.

There is also a lots of resources who can help you.

Sexuality/Birth control/STIs/Health:

Sexuality and You: sexandu.ca

HPEC Public Health: hpepublichealth.ca

Telehealth Ontario: 1-866-797-0000

Abuse/Sexual Assault:

Sexual Assault Centre : sacqd.ca

Crisis line 1-877-544-6424

Mental Health/Addiction/Counselling:

kidshelpphone.ca: 1-800-668-6868

Peer Support: psseo.ca/peer-support/     phone: 613-969-1772

Addictions Centre: addictionscentre.ca/  phone: 613-969-0077

COSP : cosp.ca/  phone: 613-966-7410

Housing:

youthab.ca: 613-969-0830

LGBTQ+ Support:

Youthline: youthline.ca/  phone: 1-800-268-9688

And here are a few books you could borrow from the library or read at the library if for any reason you don’t want to check them out.

    

Hope there is something useful for you in there.