Posts Tagged ‘Prevnet’

Bullying is a subject dear to my heart because I was bullied as a teen. I was fat, shy and read sci-fi books and a girl picked on me because of it. Then all her friends did the same. My first years of high school was HELL. I was being called names all the time. I couldn’t sit in any student area without girls ganging on me and making mean comments about my appearance. I ended up alone, hiding under a staircase to eat my lunch every day. My mom tried to cheer me up at home. It wasn’t enough however, to overcome the loneliness, the shame and the general unease I felt all day long.  At some point, I just cut myself from my emotions. It was like watching a bad movie everyday, but it stopped being painful. The drawback is that whatever could be fun stopped being felt at the same time. My life became a never ending ocean of grey.

After that, the girl that hated me the most lost interest in me. Did she mature? Did she felt guilty?  Or was it simply not fun anymore when I stopped reacting? I never known. Without her lead, everyone gradually stopped picking at me. I ended up with a group of misfit. From Grade 10, I slowly reclaimed my right to be. Then the ability to feel. Then I worked on developing social skills. Then… I had a great time in college! So, even if it’s hard, get a grip. It will get better.

Here are some book suggestions for you. More detailed and heart-breaking stories than mine. You also can scroll down directly at the end and get some really good websites about bullying, how to prevent it, how to help… how to make a difference!

 

http://www.prevnet.ca/

http://www.pacer.org/bullying/nbpm/

http://www.itgetsbetter.org  This one is designed for LGBTQ people.

Since you keep up until the end of that post, I’ll let you know something else. Me and my bully ended up going at the same college. She apologized to me after a weird unexpected meeting in a staircase. She felt bad about what she has done. I was looking down at her and she was looking up at me (we were in a staircase remember) and the only thing I told her on the moment was: “Well, it didn’t kill me”. I pondered that for a few weeks. I ended up understanding how loneliness, getting a grip on my feelings and reconstructing myself afterward actually made me a stronger better person.

I met her again at the library. I told her I forgave her. I told her I would not want to go through it again, but that I had to thank her for the person I became. I don’t know about her, but it made me feel free. That’s how I got closure. The End.

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