These 13 creepy books (some old, some new) are sure to haunt teen readers in all the right ways.

Carrie by Stephen King

Horror-master King’s first novel (published in 1974) is perfect for teen horror fans. A compact work told through fictionalized news stories, articles, and interviews, Carrie tells the tale of a telekinetic teenage girl so bullied at school that she destroys her entire town to get revenge on her cruel classmates. It’s one of the most frequently banned books in the United States and worth the read just for the pull-no-punches way King handles his subject matter.

Rot & Ruin by Jonathan Maberry

The first in a series of four zombie novels by bestselling author Maberry, Rot and Ruin is an awesome read, especially for fans of “The Walking Dead” (or anything undead, for that matter). In this first entry, Benny Imura, a resident of a post-apocalyptic, zombie-ridden U.S., must find a job by the time he turns 15 or he’ll put his family’s food supply at risk. He reluctantly learns to hunt zombies under the tutelage of his older brother, and the story that results strikes more emotional chords than just the scary ones.

Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley

Many are impressed that Shelley wrote this classic when she was just 18, but even more impressive is that she wrote it as part of a friendly contest between her, her husband (Percy Shelley), Lord Byron, and John Polidori. After pondering horror stories, Shelley dreamt of a scientist who creates life and is then terrified by his own creation. The rest is history, along with years of correcting people who think the monster’s name is Frankenstein. Nope, that’s the doctor’s name.

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Soon to be released as a film, this novel from Carnegie Medal-winner Ness was inspired by an idea from the late Siobhan Dowd and centers on Conor, a boy who has repeatedly had the same nightmare since his mother became sick. But the monster that eventually shows up at his window isn’t the one from his dream. It’s something different, and it demands something of Conor. Filled with darkness, magic, and a haunting message, it’s a fairy tale in the truest Brothers Grimm-sense of the term.

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Without Dracula, would the glimmering, crush-worthy vampires of the Twilight series exist? Probably not. Stoker’s seductive, wealthy, and well-bred Dracula comes alive (ahem) via letters, ships’ logs, and diary entries from the novel’s protagonists, including English solicitor Jonathan Harker, who becomes Dracula’s prisoner, and teacher-turned-vampire-hunter Abraham Van Helsing. Some young readers may find Stoker’s pacing a divergence from the fast-plotted books they’re used to, but this classic is worth the read.

The Fever by Megan Abbott

This one is recommended for older teens (ages 16 and up), and they won’t be able to put it down. Abbott is masterful at getting inside the heads of teen girls, and has no fear of treading into the darkest territory. This novel, based on a real illness that manifested as uncontrollable tics in a dozen teenage girls in upstate New York, probes the creepy terrain of such an epidemic and a dangerous jealousy among these adolescent girls.

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson, illustrated by Thomas Ott

First published in 1962, Jackson’s extra-creepy novel centers on the kind of family whose house would make trick-or-treating more interesting (if not more terrifying). Thanks to its character development and lack of gore, the now-classic novel is excellent for those reluctant to read horror. The story of the Blackwood sisters, their fear-inducing home, and a long-ago poisoning that killed the entire family before them earns its thrills through Jackson’s brainy, brilliant prose.

The Graces by Laure Eve

What is it about cadres of beautiful, mysterious girls that makes us want to read about them? (Oh, looks like that question answers itself.) In this new dark and lyrical novel from English writer Eve, River longs to be welcomed into the lives of the Graces, a group of rumored-to-be-witches who cast a spell over everyone in town. According to Eve herself, there’s more to the book than just are-they-witches; it’s an exploration of “the endless pull between the Other — fantasy, imagination, belief, of spirits and gods and ghosts — and the colder everyday of the real, the real that we are very afraid is all there is.”

Asylum Series by Madeleine Roux

An excellent, photo-illustrated pick for fans of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the first book in this series from Roux takes place in an inherently scary place: a former psychiatric hospital, where gifted 16-year-old Dan Crawford and other students must spend their summer instead of the cushy college prep housing they’d been expecting. The haunting page-turner takes you into the kind of dark, twisted world teens can be grateful exists only in fiction (one hopes…).

The Telling by Alexandra Sirowy

Part murder mystery and part paranormal fairy tale, Sirowy’s new book not only weaves a frightful tale, but also gets under the reader’s skin as it addresses death and dying, and discovering the truth about yourself. Teens will fall hard for Lana, a formerly shy girl who grows fearless after the death of her beloved stepbrother, as she looks into her past and the scary stories her brother told her to figure out a series of murders in her town.

Chain Letter by Christopher Pike

No list of scary reads for teens would be complete without one from the master of the genre, Pike. Yes, today’s young masters of group texts and Snapchat may scoff at the very idea of a chain letter, but they won’t be laughing as they fall deeper into the creepy tale, wherein six friends bound together by a crime are the recipients of a scary screed that demands each of them take on dangerous, impossible things.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

Stevenson’s classic tale exploring, in frightening fashion, the two sides of one self has influenced dozens of authors. Perhaps less well-known is that Stevenson wrote the tale in three days, after he had nightmares about his own double life — and then had to rewrite it in three days again when his wife burned the first manuscript because she thought it was too gruesome. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde might not strike young readers off the bat as the stuff to keep them up at night, but it raises questions about the duality of human nature that’ll keep them thinking long after they’ve turned the final page.

The Bad Seed by William March

First published in 1954, the focus of this bestselling novel, which also inspired the 1956 film of the same name, is ridiculously compelling: a child who is also a killer. For those among us who find themselves drawn to literary tales of creepy children (you’re not alone!), March’s novel was the forebear to many of those stories and is a case of one of the first also being one of the best.

What are your favorite scary reads? Let us know by leaving a comment!

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Ever since Netflix decided to make A Series of Unfortunate Events into a very fortunate TV series, we can’t help but daydream about all the amazing YA book series that would be awesome as a TV series. Here are our top picks:

1. The Luxe by Anna Godbersen

The intrigue, the dresses, the time period! The Luxe would make for a very decadent and amazing series if it was adapted for television.

About the book: Manhattan, 1899: In a world of luxury and deception, where appearance matters above everything and breaking the social code means running the risk of being ostracized forever, five teenagers lead dangerously scandalous lives. This thrilling trip to the age of innocence is anything but innocent.

Luxe cover

2. Cinder by Marissa Meyer

This futuristic retelling of Cinderella as a cyborg would make for a fantastically vivid show and each season could focus on a different character, much like the books do with Cinder, Scarlet, Cress, etc.

About the book: Humans and androids crowd the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth’s fate hinges on one girl.

Cinder cover

3. Gone by Michael Grant 

If Netflix is looking to adapt something that could be Lost-like in its mythology and multitude of characters, they don’t have to look much further.

About the book: Everyone except for the young. Teens, middle schoolers, toddlers, but not a single adult. No teachers, no police, no doctors, no parents. Gone too are the phones, internet, and television. There is no way to get help.

Gone cover

4. Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Netflix could use more series with tough as nails heroines. We vote for THRONE OF GLASS.

About the book: In a land without magic, where the king rules with an iron hand, an assassin is summoned to the castle. She comes not to kill the king, but to win her freedom. If she defeats twenty-three killers, thieves, and warriors in a competition, she is released from prison to serve as the king’s champion. Her name is Celaena Sardothien.

Throne of Glass cover

5. The Selection by Kiera Cass

If television doesn’t want to show us the pretty dresses from The Luxe series, then we’ll forgive them as long as they then show us the pretty dresses from The Selection!

About the book: For thirty-five girls, the Selection is the chance of a lifetime. The opportunity to escape the life laid out for them since birth. To be swept up in a world of glittering gowns and priceless jewels. To live in a palace and compete for the heart of the gorgeous Prince Maxon.

The Selection cover

6. The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken

We need this as a show.

About the book: When Ruby woke up on her tenth birthday, something about her had changed. Something alarming enough to make her parents lock her in the garage and call the police. Something that gets her sent to Thurmond, a brutal government “rehabilitation camp.” She might have survived the mysterious disease that’s killed most of America’s children, but she and the others have emerged with something far worse: frightening abilities they cannot control.

The Darkest Minds cover

7. Something Strange & Deadly by Susan Dennard

In general, we want more zombies on TV, but since nothing really can beat modern-day or near-future zombies like The Walking Dead, we suggest turning the clock back a century and going with 1800s zombies.

Something Strange and Deadly cover

8. The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

We’re having a grand old time just thinking about the casting process for this amazing series.

About the book: Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue never sees them–until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks to her. His name is Gansey, a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

The Raven Boys cover

9. A Thousand Pieces of You by Claudia Gray

There aren’t enough parallel universe stories out there and a show based on this book series would be done best if J.J. Abrams was producing it!

About the book: Marguerite Caine’s physicist parents are known for their groundbreaking achievements. Their most astonishing invention, called the Firebird, allows users to jump into multiple universes—and promises to revolutionize science forever. But then Marguerite’s father is murdered, and the killer—her parent’s handsome, enigmatic assistant Paul—escapes into another dimension before the law can touch him. Marguerite refuses to let the man who destroyed her family go free. So she races after Paul through different universes, always leaping into another version of herself.

A Thousand Pieces of You cover

10. Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

This isn’t a traditional series, but rather a series of interconnected standalones, but it would still make for an amazing, cute, international show about finding your true love!

About the book: Anna is looking forward to her senior year in Atlanta, where she has a great job, a loyal best friend, and a crush on the verge of becoming more. Which is why she is less than thrilled about being shipped off to boarding school in Paris–until she meets Étienne St. Clair. Smart, charming, beautiful, Étienne has it all…including a serious girlfriend. But in the City of Light, wishes have a way of coming true. Will a year of romantic near-misses end with their long-awaited French kiss?

Anna and the French Kiss cover

11. The Brokenhearted by Amelia Kahaney

There are plenty of superhero shows out there (Arrow, The Flash, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.) so we think The Brokenhearted would make a unique addition to that lineup. It’s sort of like The Bionic Woman meets Batman.

About the book: Anthem Fleet, talented ballerina and heir to the Fleet fortune, has always been closely guarded by her parents in their penthouse apartment. Lured by the handsome and dangerous Gavin, Anthem is drawn into the dark and exhilarating world on the wrong side of town. But when the couple runs into trouble, Gavin goes missing and Anthem winds up dead . . . only to awaken in an underground lab with a bionic heart ticking in her chest. Now she can run faster, jump higher, fight better. But the only thing that matters to her is getting Gavin back. And when she uncovers the sinister truth behind those she trusted the most, she is determined to use her new-found powers for the ultimate revenge.

The Broken Hearted cover

12. Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

This trilogy would be the must watch show of the season!

About the book: Mare Barrow’s world is divided by blood—those with common, Red blood serve the Silver- blooded elite, who are gifted with superhuman abilities. Mare is a Red, scraping by as a thief in a poor, rural village, until a twist of fate throws her in front of the Silver court where she discovers she has an ability of her own. To cover up this impossibility, the king forces her to play the role of a lost Silver princess and betroths her to one of his own sons. As Mare is drawn further into the Silver world uses her new position to secretly help the growing Red rebellion. One wrong move can lead to her death, but in the dangerous game she plays, the only certainty is betrayal.

The Red Queen cover

What other YA series would you like to see as TV shows? Tell us in the comments below!

Everyone likes to speculate about trends: fashion, sports, video games… But this is a library’s blog, so let’s concentrate on books. Here are a few Young Adult books announced for 2018 that: 1) Are/were impatiently awaited by all the bookish community 2) Belleville Public Library owns copies.

You may choose between: western with a kick-ass female protagonist (Gunslinger girl), historical thriller (Orphan Monster Spy), short romance stories (Meet Cute) or apocalyptic with a side of zombies novel (Dread nation). Maybe you would prefer murder mystery? (Truly devious, People like us, Murdertrending) This is like a literary buffet!

Click on the covers to get more info!

 

Tell us what is your favorite read of 2018!

The past is fascinating. I like to read about how humanity coped before computers. As a member of the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism) the events I like the most are the ones called “Arts & Science”. Basically, people research and try their hands at old techniques of weaving, cooking, woodworking… name it. I learn something new every time. It’s amazing how clever our ancestors were.

History is made of people who, knowingly or not, changed the course of event by their actions. What happened in the past can be interesting. There is so much people that didn’t make it into textbook… What their lives could have been like? That’s where historical fiction comes from.

Yes I did write that much just to get at: here is a list of historical fiction books. I tried to get a lot of different eras and genres here.

If you scroll all the way down, there is two of my favorite Manga series too: A Bride’s story that relates Amir’s life who lives in Turkic Central Asia during the 19th century and Vinland Saga, the story of a Viking named Thorfinn and his efforts to get to Vinland (which is Newfoundland by the way).

 

Are books with a main protagonist having a mental illness a trend? OCDaniel by Wesley King, Bent not broken by Lorna Schultz Nicholson, A tragic kind of wonderful by Eric Lindstrom… Turtles all the way down is a good example of this trend. The main character, Aza is anxious and has obsessive-compulsive behaviors that threaten her social life… well actually it threatens her actual life too. (DAM dam DAM… suspense!)

 

So, my opinion is: it’s a good book, but Paper towns and The fault in our stars are better. So whether you liked Turtles all the way down or not, read the two others they are worth it. Especially Paper towns, in my opinion.

 

 

This said, you may have liked Turtles all the way down so much you want a read-alike. Here are some for you if it is the case!

Enjoy the spring warmth by reading one of them outside!

Maze Runner is a really popular series of YA dystopian fiction. Fast-paced, dark and mysterious, the first book begins as Thomas wakes up in the middle of a gigantic maze with no memories whatsoever. There is three books in the series: The maze runner, The scorch trials and The death cure. The kill order was published afterward but is actually a prequel. You may click on the covers here to get more information.

   

If you liked this excellent thrilling series, some of the titles below might appeal to you as well!

aconfusionofprincesgarthnix  darkestmindsalexndrabracken deliriumlaurenoliver enclaveannaguirre incarceroncatherinefisher jamesdashner lefthandofgodpaulhoffman legendmarielu matchedallysonbraithwaite partialsdanwells supernaturalisteioncolferthe5thwaverichardyancey ugliesscottwesterfeld unwindnealshusterman variantrobisonwells

Let us know which is your favorite fast-paced action book of all time!

Who never asked for a pet? A dog, or a poney, or an iguana or a cat… name it! Authors like pets too and some of them write stories about them…

So, what is your favorite book about an animal?